Life Hacks

Life Hack Experiment: Build a public To Watch video list

I'm going to try a life hack experiment. I've found some interesting videos on MSDN Channel 9 that I would like to watch, like this one about Windows PowerShell. But, I don't have the time to watch them all right now. So I'm going to post them by using the Silverlight embedding feature of the Silverlight video player they use to batch them up and review later. And, as an added benefit, anyone that is interested can check out the collection too.

This technique can apply to more than just Microsoft videos. Certainly, YouTube or UStream.TV could benefit from this approach.

I'll be sure to tag the post with an appropriate topic-oriented tag, but I may also include a media-oriented tag like "Video" or "Video to Watch" so I can navigate them using my Drupal blog's taxonomy features.

So, without further ado, here is the embedded video about PowerShell:

Enjoy!

Life Hack: Subscribe to Your Own Twitter Favorites to Consolidate an Inbox

Twitter's "Real" Value?

A lot of the value I get out of Twitter is the "microblogging" aspect in which people post a quick link to a useful or meaningful or funny web page. Sure, Twitter can help you stay up to date on those you "follow," but it's also a great data mining tool. In the same way blogs allow you to plug into the brains of interesting people, Twitter allows you a micro version of this technique. In some ways, Twitter has some advantages over blog reading/writing:

  • Twitter limits your post to 140 characters, so you have to be concise. This might (not guaranteed) cause you to keep your message to just the bare essentials--there's no room for fluff!
  • Twitter forces the writer to be concise, so reading a Twitter "micro blog" post is quick and easy.

Time to Consolidate Those Inboxes!

As GTD creator David Allen recommends, I'm constantly striving to consolidate my inboxes (having as many as I need and as few as I can get away with). Rather than subscribe to a ton of email newsletters and clutter that inbox, I prefer to let Google Reader take care of the information I want to keep up with.

Twitter, in effect, is just one more inbox to deal with. It's yet another stream of incoming data that you must process. As with any inbox, an honest evaluation of its value and how it might be consolidated should be made.

The Problem: I Can't Read That Right Now...

If you follow very many people on Twitter, the amount of traffic that streams by your consciousness is mind-boggling. There's not enough time to read all of the "tweets," let alone all of the pages they point to.

The Answer: ...But I Can Save It For Later

As pointed out in a comment by Morten Skogly, you can access the favorites of any user as an RSS feed. This can be useful for really tapping into someone's brain. Instead of hearing all of the noise they put out, you can use them as a filter by monitoring what they value.

Just use the following pattern for an RSS feed of a Twitter user's favorites:
http://www.twitter.com/favorites/username.rss

Substitute the actual name of the user for "username" in the link above.

Taken a step further, you can subscribe to your own favorites using the same technique. This allows you to quickly tag something in Twitter as a favorite, while using Google Reader (or other news aggregator) as your "command center" for all things RSS! So tag your favorite tweets using the star, and it will show up for your later review in Google Reader.

Here Are My Favorites

My Twitter favorites RSS feed can be found here:
http://www.twitter.com/favorites/xagronaut.rss

You can follow my Twitter postings here:
http://www.twitter.com/xagronaut

Feedback

Do you have any life hacks using RSS and Twitter? Let me know! Just leave a comment!

GTD Processing Phase

The Processing phase is where you evaluate everything in your "In" boxes and make decisions about what should happen next with each item. This page aims to offer tips and ideas for effective use of the Processing Phase.

Time/Life Management Books

I have read (or at least purchased) a few books in my lifetime about managing time and being organized. Here's a partial list:

How I Cope: Staying on Top of Life

This "book" (in Drupal terms) includes content described by a number of phrases, all of which apply, at least in part:

I'm cataloging this content here as an experiment. Partly with Drupal and partly with a non-wiki publishing format.

Syndicate content